Kairi Chronicles

Legends are immortal dreams made flesh…

Kaya Abaniah believes he’s an ordinary fourteen-year-old college student. He lives with his mother on the Caribbean island of Trinidad; he’s passionate about wildlife conservation and has a crush on the prettiest girl in his class.

However, one fateful day, Kaya’s life is changed forever when he encounters Papa Bois, a folklore character similar to the Greek god, Pan.

Kaya learns he has the talent. He’s a telepath, and he’s not alone. He discovers that men in black are constantly watching him, Soucouyant, the shape-shifting vampire wants his blood, and his packed lunch is never safe.

Will Kaya succeed in protecting his relatives and friends from the supernatural evils that lurk on the tropic isle? Can he reveal the shape-shifter’s secret identity? And, why on Earth is the most gorgeous girl, he’s ever known, so interested in him?

Follow Kaya’s struggles with love, rivalry, and academic life, as he confronts the terrifying creatures of Trinidad and Tobago’s folklore, and unlocks the shocking mystery of Papa Bois, the father of the forest.

About the Author:
Wayne Gerard Trotman is a Trinidadian British writer, blogger, filmmaker, artist, photographer, composer and producer of electronic music. Born in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, Trotman immigrated to England in 1984, where he lives with his wife and two sons.

"The author takes a medley of science fiction tropes, from aliens and spaceships to telepathy and artificial intelligence and creates an epic, universe-building tale."


Kaya Abaniah (Kah-yuh Abba-na-yuh) is a boy's name. Kaya Abaniah and the Father of the Forest is a unique story, set in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. In this two-island Caribbean nation, inhabited primarily by people of African and Indian descent, Trinidadian English is the official spoken language, and Standard English is the official written language. However, Kaya speaks authentic Trinidadian Creole, which is similar, but distinct from Tobagonian Creole. Trinbagonians (Trinidadians and Tobagonians) use Creole in spontaneous conversation, while Trinidadian English is often reserved for more formal speech. Various combinations of English, Trinidadian English, and Creole are not uncommon.

The creole languages of Trinidad and Tobago mix English-derived vocabularies with elements from several African languages. Trinidadian Creole also has influences from French and French Creole, as well as other languages spoken by Trinidad’s diverse cultures and ethnicities. These include Spanish, from its proximity to Venezuela, Bhojpuri introduced by immigrants from India, and Cantonese, Hakka, and Mandarin brought by Chinese immigrants. Trinidad Creole is quite different to Jamaican Patois, which is also spoken in this story.

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